Book #14917

A Farewell To Arms - 1st Edition/1st Printing

Ernest Hemingway
A Farewell To Arms - 1st Edition/1st Printing. Ernest Hemingway.
A Farewell To Arms - 1st Edition/1st Printing
A Farewell To Arms - 1st Edition/1st Printing

Binding: Hardcover
Book Condition: Fine in Near Fine dust jacket
Edition: First Edition; First Printing
Size: 8vo
Publisher: New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1929.

A beautiful first edition in Fine condition with slightly toned endpapers and paste-downs. One of 31,050 books of the first printing (page x is blank and does not contain the legal disclaimer that did not arrive in time) in smooth black cloth with bright gold paper labels. Very nearly Fine first state dust-jacket with misspelled Katharine versus Catherine, slightly rubbed and chipped, mainly along spine. Hanneman A8. In custom made, clamshell case with sculpted Farewell To Arms design.

At the age of 18, Ernest Hemingway was eager to serve in the Great War, however, poor vision made him join the ambulance corps instead and was sent to France. Transferred to Italy, he became the first American wounded in that country during World War I. Hemingway came out of the European battlefields with a medal for valor and a wealth of experience that he would, 10 years later, turn into gold with A Farewell to Arms.

Price: $9,000.00

Author Bio

Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Miller Hemingway was born July 21, 1899 in Oak Park, Illinois. A writer and journalist, he is best known for his novels The Sun Also Rises (1926), A Farewell to Arms (1929), and The Old Man and the Sea (1952).

He volunteered for an ambulance unit during World War I and later became a leading member of the "Lost Generation." His terse, understated prose made an indelible mark on 20th century literature and his persona as a sportsman and adventurer inspired generations of followers.

He received the Pulitzer Prize in 1953 for The Old Man and the Sea, and the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954.

He nearly died in two plane crashes and the injuries he sustained left him in pain for his remaining years. In 1961, Hemingway committed suicide at his home in Idaho.